Destillation

Johann Dürr, Still (Portrait of Johann Michaelis, Detail), 1653, Print, 276 x 167 mm, Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum

Although Natura Exenterata contains instructions for distilling and preparing chemical remedies such as aurum potabile and antimony, Tart Hall’s 1641 inventory does not mention any stills. This is different in the inventory of Lady Arundel’s house in Amsterdam drawn up in 1654/55. Famous for its long list of valuable paintings at the end, the inventory starts with detailing the residence room by room, beginning on the top floor: “In primis a small terrestrial Globe and frame. About forty glasses great and small full and empty of water, syrup and about thirty potts of severall sorte of syrups preserves and preserves.”


Arundel v. Stafford, 1658, 684 verso, Kew, National Archives

The first entries in the inventory of the Amsterdam residence clearly describe the products of distillation, the result of extraction, transformation and conservation. Later in the inventory, one room is tellingly referred to as the “Glass Chamber.” The stills, however, were stored in the stable and in the basement, among others several stills for various purposes and an alembic, a large copper still and an herbal press.

Johann Dürr, Still (Portrait of Johann Michaelis, Detail), 1653, Print, 276 x 167 mm, Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum

In her country estate in Amersfoort, , Lady Arundel had her own Phisick Roome, in which, apart from a single leather chair, the room contained mainly different scales and flasks made of copper. Just like in Amsterdam, there are also mentioned numerous stills in Amersfoort.



Cite this blog post
Jennifer Rabe (2022, February 26). Destillation. Lady Arundel 1654–2054. Retrieved May 23, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.58079/qpdy

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search